Jean Ge assists the firm’s Biotechnology Group in patent prosecution. She has extensive knowledge in the areas of molecular and cellular biology, microbiology, biochemistry and structural biology.

Prior to joining the firm, Jean held a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), where she conducted research on the inhibition mechanism of Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) pathway and human gene regulation. Jean also completed an internship at the Office of Technology Transfer and Development (OTTAD) of NHLBI, where she gained experience in technology transfer in the federal government, research commercialization, patentability assessment, as well as patent prosecution. For her graduate studies, Jean worked in the Center for Infectious Diseases at Stony Brook University, conducting research on co-translational mRNA and protein quality control in bacteria and microbial pathogenicity.

Throughout her academic career, Jean presented her work at international conferences and co-authored several publications in leading scientific journals.
  • NHLBI Annual Retreat Best Poster Award, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2013
  • NIH Intramural Research Training Award, National Institutes of Health 2012
  • NIH Travel Award, National Institutes of Health National Graduate Students Research Conference 2011
  • Academic Excellence Scholarship, Nanjing University 2002 & 2006


Scientific Publications

Ge, Z., Quek, B., Beemon, K.L., and Hogg, J.R. PTBP1 excludes UPF1 to protect long 3’UTRs from nonsensemediated mRNA decay. eLife

Ge, Z., Mehta, P., Richards, J., and Karzai, A.W. (2010) Non-stop mRNA decay initiates at the ribosome. Mol Microbiol. 78(5):1159-70.

Ge, Z., and Karzai, A.W. (2009) Co-evolution of multipartite interactions between an extended tmRNA tag and a robust Lon protease in Mycoplasma. Mol Microbiol. 74(5):1083-99.

Sundermeier, T., Ge, Z., Richards, J., Dulebohn, D., and Karzai, A.W. (2008) Studying tmRNA-mediated surveillance and nonstop mRNA decay. Methods in enzymology. 447, 329-358.


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Jean Ge assists the firm’s Biotechnology Group in patent prosecution. She has extensive knowledge in the areas of molecular and cellular biology, microbiology, biochemistry and structural biology.

Prior to joining the firm, Jean held a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), where she conducted research on the inhibition mechanism of Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) pathway and human gene regulation. Jean also completed an internship at the Office of Technology Transfer and Development (OTTAD) of NHLBI, where she gained experience in technology transfer in the federal government, research commercialization, patentability assessment, as well as patent prosecution. For her graduate studies, Jean worked in the Center for Infectious Diseases at Stony Brook University, conducting research on co-translational mRNA and protein quality control in bacteria and microbial pathogenicity.

Throughout her academic career, Jean presented her work at international conferences and co-authored several publications in leading scientific journals.
  • NHLBI Annual Retreat Best Poster Award, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2013
  • NIH Intramural Research Training Award, National Institutes of Health 2012
  • NIH Travel Award, National Institutes of Health National Graduate Students Research Conference 2011
  • Academic Excellence Scholarship, Nanjing University 2002 & 2006

Scientific Publications

Ge, Z., Quek, B., Beemon, K.L., and Hogg, J.R. PTBP1 excludes UPF1 to protect long 3’UTRs from nonsensemediated mRNA decay. eLife

Ge, Z., Mehta, P., Richards, J., and Karzai, A.W. (2010) Non-stop mRNA decay initiates at the ribosome. Mol Microbiol. 78(5):1159-70.

Ge, Z., and Karzai, A.W. (2009) Co-evolution of multipartite interactions between an extended tmRNA tag and a robust Lon protease in Mycoplasma. Mol Microbiol. 74(5):1083-99.

Sundermeier, T., Ge, Z., Richards, J., Dulebohn, D., and Karzai, A.W. (2008) Studying tmRNA-mediated surveillance and nonstop mRNA decay. Methods in enzymology. 447, 329-358.