Alan Hebert assists the firm in patent prosecution primarily in the areas of molecular and cellular biology, in vitro diagnostic medical devices, genetics, and in particular CRISPR/Cas9 technologies. He also has extensive knowledge in the areas of antibody development technologies, microbiology, biochemistry, mouse models of disease, and microscopy pharmacology.

Before joining the firm, Alan was Lead Scientist at Leica Biosystems where he led the development of class III in vitro companion diagnostic medical devices in compliance with FDA regulatory requirements. He also served on Leica’s Patent Review Board where he implemented strategies to generate invention disclosures from scientific innovations.

Alan’s doctoral work focused on the role of the NF2 tumor suppressor Merlin and the closely related ERM proteins in organizing the cell cortex to control spindle orientation and tissue architecture. Alan’s doctoral work resulted in the publication of two scientific papers.

After receiving his undergraduate degree, Alan worked as a research technician in the lab of Marc Kirschner at Harvard Medical School where he headed a high-throughput chemical genetic screening research project exploiting the essential bacterial cell division protein FtsZ as a broad spectrum antibacterial target. He also identified lead compounds, determined mechanism of action, and tested in vivo activity. Alan was a teaching fellow at Harvard Medical School (Molecular Pharmacology) and Northeastern University (Molecular Biology). He also worked as a scientific recruiter for the medical schools at Harvard and Tufts Universities and served as the Manager of the Fluorescence Microscope Suite at Massachusetts General Hospital.

During college, Alan worked as a research intern at Millennium Pharmaceuticals where he identified full-length gene targets for therapy and analyzed tissue specific expression profiles of novel gene targets.

  • Boston Patent Law Association
  • Sigma Xi
  • Alan was awarded a thesis research grant from Union College.

Blogs

February 2, 2017

A Double-Edged Sword: What the Immune System and Prior Art Have in Common



Scientific Publications

Hebert AM, DuBoff B, Casaletto JB, Gladden AB, McClatchey AI. (2012) Merlin/ERM proteins establish cortical asymmetry and centrosome position. Genes Dev. 15;26(24):2709-23.

Gladden AB, Hebert AM, Schneeberger EE, McClatchey AI. (2010) The NF2 tumor suppressor, Merlin, regulates epidermal development through the establishment of a junctional polarity complex. Dev Cell. 16;19(5):727-39.

Mukherjee S, Robinson CA, Howe AG, Mazor T, Wood PA, Urgaonkar S, Hebert AM, Raychaudhuri D, Shaw JT. (2007) N-Benzyl-3-sulfonamidopyrrolidines as novel inhibitors of cell division in E. coli. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 1;17(23):6651-5.

Margalit DN, Romberg L, Mets RB, Hebert AM, Mitchison TJ, Kirschner MW, RayChaudhuri D. Targeting cell division: small-molecule inhibitors of FtsZ GTPase perturb cytokinetic ring assembly and induce bacterial lethality. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 10;101(32):118216. Epub. Erratum in: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 21;101(38):13969.


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Alan Hebert assists the firm in patent prosecution primarily in the areas of molecular and cellular biology, in vitro diagnostic medical devices, genetics, and in particular CRISPR/Cas9 technologies. He also has extensive knowledge in the areas of antibody development technologies, microbiology, biochemistry, mouse models of disease, and microscopy pharmacology.

Before joining the firm, Alan was Lead Scientist at Leica Biosystems where he led the development of class III in vitro companion diagnostic medical devices in compliance with FDA regulatory requirements. He also served on Leica’s Patent Review Board where he implemented strategies to generate invention disclosures from scientific innovations.

Alan’s doctoral work focused on the role of the NF2 tumor suppressor Merlin and the closely related ERM proteins in organizing the cell cortex to control spindle orientation and tissue architecture. Alan’s doctoral work resulted in the publication of two scientific papers.

After receiving his undergraduate degree, Alan worked as a research technician in the lab of Marc Kirschner at Harvard Medical School where he headed a high-throughput chemical genetic screening research project exploiting the essential bacterial cell division protein FtsZ as a broad spectrum antibacterial target. He also identified lead compounds, determined mechanism of action, and tested in vivo activity. Alan was a teaching fellow at Harvard Medical School (Molecular Pharmacology) and Northeastern University (Molecular Biology). He also worked as a scientific recruiter for the medical schools at Harvard and Tufts Universities and served as the Manager of the Fluorescence Microscope Suite at Massachusetts General Hospital.

During college, Alan worked as a research intern at Millennium Pharmaceuticals where he identified full-length gene targets for therapy and analyzed tissue specific expression profiles of novel gene targets.

  • Boston Patent Law Association
  • Sigma Xi
  • Alan was awarded a thesis research grant from Union College.

Scientific Publications

Hebert AM, DuBoff B, Casaletto JB, Gladden AB, McClatchey AI. (2012) Merlin/ERM proteins establish cortical asymmetry and centrosome position. Genes Dev. 15;26(24):2709-23.

Gladden AB, Hebert AM, Schneeberger EE, McClatchey AI. (2010) The NF2 tumor suppressor, Merlin, regulates epidermal development through the establishment of a junctional polarity complex. Dev Cell. 16;19(5):727-39.

Mukherjee S, Robinson CA, Howe AG, Mazor T, Wood PA, Urgaonkar S, Hebert AM, Raychaudhuri D, Shaw JT. (2007) N-Benzyl-3-sulfonamidopyrrolidines as novel inhibitors of cell division in E. coli. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 1;17(23):6651-5.

Margalit DN, Romberg L, Mets RB, Hebert AM, Mitchison TJ, Kirschner MW, RayChaudhuri D. Targeting cell division: small-molecule inhibitors of FtsZ GTPase perturb cytokinetic ring assembly and induce bacterial lethality. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 10;101(32):118216. Epub. Erratum in: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 21;101(38):13969.

Blogs

February 2, 2017

A Double-Edged Sword: What the Immune System and Prior Art Have in Common